mediation

Don’t Neglect Mediation!

Posted by David Adelstein on February 26, 2017
Trial Perspectives / Comments Off on Don’t Neglect Mediation!

 

I believe in the process of mediation for all disputes, particularly complicated factual business disputes.   I use the word “process” because that is what mediation really is – a series of actions to achieve a particular end. Mediation can be a tiring process. A frustrating process. An informative process. A continuing process. A result oriented process. In certain instances, a futile process. Oftentimes, mediation is a mixture of all of the above. But, mediation allows parties to make a business decision based on their perception of risk — the risk of losing or the risk of a damages award (greater or lesser than expectations).   This business decision is important because a party, typically, never wants to bank on the resources and uncertainty that goes along with trial (and, then the appeal) without truly knowing where that case could have been resolved at during the course of a dispute.

 

The process of mediation should not be taken for granted. Preparation is important. I believe in learning the facts and developing the theme of the case and persuasively presenting this theme at mediation.   This may include demonstrative aids. A powerpoint. Handouts of key documents. A well-versed narrative. The participation of fact witnesses. The participation of experts. You name it — whatever best tells the story of the dispute.

 

I also want to hear the other side’s presentation of their theme because they may make good points that factor into a party’s business decision. Look, in my experience, there is no such thing as a slam dunk dispute. If it was truly a slam dunk dispute, parties could probably resolve the dispute without the assistance of counsel. As such, there are probably issues of contention that are worth considering, whether from a factual or legal perspective.

 

Once the presentations and themes are out there, there is strategy that goes into trying to get the case resolved. This strategy comes from the mediator and, of course, the parties. I prefer an aggressive mediator. What I mean by this is I prefer a mediator that is not afraid to be direct or assertive with a party. I know if a mediator is being direct with my client he/she is doing the same thing with the other party. I need a mediator that is going to be more than simply a message carrier. He/she needs to be able to get the parties to compromise from their positions and oftentimes the only way to do this is to be strategically direct and assertive. A good mediator finds a way to get cases resolved or puts the parties in the best position to make a business decision, even if that decision results in an impasse at mediation.  

The clip above from the movie Wedding Crashers is a great opening scene in a movie dealing with the mediation of a family law dispute.  Sure, this is an unorthodox mediation, but it was a hilarious strategy that allowed the parties to make a business decision.  

 

 

Please contact David Adelstein at dadelstein@gmail.com or (954) 361-4720 if you have questions or would like more information regarding this article. You can follow David Adelstein on Twitter @DavidAdelstein1.

 

 

 

 

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