В сложной финансовой ситуации приходит на помощь кредит наличными в Казахстане.

property insurance

Standard for Petition for Writ of Certiorari

Posted by David Adelstein on August 18, 2019
Appeal / Comments Off on Standard for Petition for Writ of Certiorari

To invoke an appellate court’s certiorari jurisdiction, [t]he petitioning party must demonstrate that the contested order constitutes (1) a departure from the essential requirements of the law, (2) resulting in material injury for the remainder of the case[,] (3) that cannot be corrected on post-judgment appeal.

State Farm Florida Ins. Co. v. Sanders, 44 Fla.L.Weekly D1901a (Fla. 3d DCA 2019) quoting Rousso v. Hannon, 146 So.3d 66, 69 (Fla. 3d DCA 2014) (internal quotations omitted). 

This is the standard for a petition for writ of certiorari.

An example of an appellate court granting a petition for writ of certiorari and quashing a trial court’s order can be found in State Farm Florida Ins. Co. v. Sanders, which dealt with a property insurance coverage dispute. 

In this case, after the policyholder filed a lawsuit against his insurer, the insurer filed a motion to compel the parties to the appraisal process mandated by the property insurance policy.  An issue arose as to the parties’ selection of “disinterested” appraisers as required by the policy.  The policyholder wanted to use his public adjuster, which the insurer contested because the public adjuster is hardly disinterested – he is an agent for the policyholder. Notwithstanding, the trial court entered an order allowing the policyholder’s public adjuster to serve as the disinterested appraiser prompting the insurer to file a petition for writ of certiorari.

The appellate court granted the petition because allowing the public adjuster to serve as a disinterested appraiser is a harm that could NOT be corrected in a post-judgment appeal. A major reason for this is the nature of the property insurance appraisal process is a binding process, as more particularly outlined in the property insurance policy. 

If you are considering filing a petition for writ of certiorari, know the standard you need to satisfy to get the appellate court to entertain the petition and quash the trial court’s order.

 

Please contact David Adelstein at dadelstein@gmail.com or (954) 361-4720 if you have questions or would like more information regarding this article. You can follow David Adelstein on Twitter @DavidAdelstein1.

Tags: , ,

Supplemental Property Insurance Claim

Posted by David Adelstein on August 10, 2019
Trial Perspectives / Comments Off on Supplemental Property Insurance Claim

In a recent property insurance dispute, Chavez v. Tower Hill Insurance Company, 44 Fla. L. Weekly D2019b (Fla. 3d DCA 2019), an insured previously sued his property insurer and lost.  The insured then filed a new suit against his property insurer for the same damages.  The trial court, affirmed by the appellate court, held that res judicata applied to bar the insured’s new lawsuit against the insurer.  The insured tried to argue that res judicata should not apply because the new lawsuit was predicated on a supplemental claim, as there is law that res judicata does not apply if the new lawsuit concerns a supplemental claim.

An issue on appeal concerned what actually constitutes a supplemental property insurance claim.  The appellate court stated: “We agree with the learned trial court that a supplemental claim means an additional claim made after an insured has actually undertaken or commenced repairs arising out of damages for a covered loss and after the insurer has tendered initial payment based upon its determination of actual cash value.”  Chavez, supra.

Thus, for there to be a supplemental claim, the insured has to actually undertake repairs.

 

Please contact David Adelstein at dadelstein@gmail.com or (954) 361-4720 if you have questions or would like more information regarding this article. You can follow David Adelstein on Twitter @DavidAdelstein1.

Tags: , , ,

Quick Note: Interpretation of a Contract (Policy) is for the Court, Not the Jury

Posted by David Adelstein on July 07, 2018
Appeal, Trial Perspectives / Comments Off on Quick Note: Interpretation of a Contract (Policy) is for the Court, Not the Jury

The construction / interpretation of a contract including an insurance policy is a question of law. This means it is for the court, not the jury, to interpret a contract.

While there are times parties may prefer to delegate this responsibility to a jury, this is not allowed.

In a recent property insurance coverage dispute, the insured, over the insurer’s objection, was able to get jury instructions instructing to the jury regarding the interpretation of the insurance policy.  On appeal, the appellate remanded the case back to the trial court for a new trial, as the interpretation of the policy was a role reserved for the judge, not the jury.  See Citizens Property Ins. Corp. v. Mendoza, 43 Fla. L. Weekly D1523a (Fla. 4th DCA 2018) (finding other errors that occurred in the trial and maintaining it was the trial judge’s job to instruct the jury that certain exclusions in the policy were not in conflict or sustain objections as to arguments to the contrary).

The judge interprets the policy; the jury, in an insurance coverage dispute, determines whether the facts fall within the scope of coverage.

 

Please contact David Adelstein at dadelstein@gmail.com or (954) 361-4720 if you have questions or would like more information regarding this article. You can follow David Adelstein on Twitter @DavidAdelstein1.

Tags: , , ,

Quick Note: Appeal of Jury Instructions with Wrong Burden of Proof

Posted by David Adelstein on January 24, 2018
Appeal, Burden of Proof / Comments Off on Quick Note: Appeal of Jury Instructions with Wrong Burden of Proof

I recently talked about the burden of proof when it comes to an all-risk property insurance policy.  This article is important for insureds that have a property insurance claim and are dealing with certain insurance coverage issues with their property insurer. The case at-issue discussed in the article dealt with an appeal of the jury instructions that were read to the jury.  Specifically, the issue was whether the trial court applied the right burden of proof in the jury instructions.  This issue is reviewed under a de novo standard of appellate review.  See Jones v. Federated National Ins. Co., 43 Fla. L. Weekly D164a (Fla. 4th DCA 2018) citing Daniels v. State, 121 So.3d 409, 413 (Fla. 2013).  

The appellate court found the the trial court’s jury instructions were erroneous meaning the case was remanded back to the trial court for a new trial (with correct jury instructions regarding the burden of proof).

It is important to note that at the charging conference between counsel and the judge to discuss the jury instructions that will be read to the jury, the insured’s lawyer objected to the jury instructions that the judge was going to read to the jury.  This charging conference is important and, as the insured’s lawyer did in this case, it is crucial to object to any jury instruction that is incorrect and/or applies the wrong burden of proof. 

Please contact David Adelstein at dadelstein@gmail.com or (954) 361-4720 if you have questions or would like more information regarding this article. You can follow David Adelstein on Twitter @DavidAdelstein1.

Tags: , , , , ,

Contact Me Now

Prove YOUR Case!

Contact:

David Adelstein ♦

(954) 361-4720 ♦

dadelstein@gmail.com